Adventure Stories For Young Readers Deadline Extended

Since there are several people who have said they want to submit, but didn’t have time before the 15th, I have decided to extend the submission window the 25th of May.

Click Here To Go To Sanderley Studios

I am partnering with Cedar Sanderson’s newly formed Sanderley Studios to produce a collection of short fiction for young readers.

I am looking for exciting adventure stories that showcase (but not preach) virtues, suitable for boys and girls in their teens.

Submissions open on Mar 15th and will run until May 15th.

The ideal story would be between 5,000 and 10,000 words and be action oriented. All genres considered, but exotic settings preferred–Science Fiction and Fantasy, but also Wilderness Survival and Historical Fiction.

In my opinion children get enough Real Life Drama from assigned school books, this collection should be an escape from their ordinary life.

The audience, as I said, is junior high to high school aged children, but the characters need not be of that age group. Stories that do have young characters should show those characters obedient to parents and legitimate authority. The goal is to model healthy adult/child relationships. The fact that so many children today come from broken homes is, in my opinion, a reason for families to be shown as stronger, not weaker.

There is more information at the link above, but questions or submissions should be sent to me at mjb63114@gmail.com.

Please use [Your Name] Young Adventure Submission [Title Of Story] as the subject line of the email. Include in the body of the email a brief description of the story that includes word count, genre, and publication history if any. I am looking for unpublished stories, but may consider stories previously published on-line.

Stories should be attached to the email. Open Office files are preferred, but I can convert word documents or .rtf files. PDFs will not be opened.

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Invitation To A Duet

I currently have seven unfinished stories for which I would like to find co-authors. They cover a wide range of genres, Fantasy, Horror, Science Fiction, all with my signature Weird flavor.

To this end I am offering to send interested authors a zip file containing the stories. If you would like me to send it to you, drop me a line via my contact page. (I can’t seem to add the link–it’s the park that says “Reach Out And Touch Me” directly above.)

Asking for the file doesn’t obligate you to anything. Read over the partial stories and see if any of them spark your interest. If you would like to work on one or more of them, send me a brief description of what you’d like to do, working from what I have set down.

I’ll choose which author gets which story, based on the pocket outlines. Assuming that I get enough interested replies, then I’ll work with each author, offering my feedback and comments and reworking my sections if necessary to make the stories hang together.

Ideally we will end up with seven stories that can then be collected into a book which I will shop around to a small press for publication.

Payment will be dependent upon the publisher, most likely royalty sharing. For my own part, I will cede to the coauthors reprint rights so that you can publish the stories in your own collections, provided that I am given coauthor credit.

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Adventure Stories For Young Readers

Click Here To Go To Sanderley Studios

I am partnering with Cedar Sanderson’s newly formed Sanderley Studios to produce a collection of short fiction for young readers.

I am looking for exciting adventure stories that showcase (but not preach) virtues, suitable for boys and girls in their teens.

Submissions open on Mar 15th and will run until May 15th.

The ideal story would be between 5,000 and 10,000 words and be action oriented. All genres considered, but exotic settings preferred–Science Fiction and Fantasy, but also Wilderness Survival and Historical Fiction.

In my opinion children get enough Real Life Drama from assigned school books, this collection should be an escape from their ordinary life.

The audience, as I said, is junior high to high school aged children, but the characters need not be of that age group. Stories that do have young characters should show those characters obedient to parents and legitimate authority. The goal is to model healthy adult/child relationships. The fact that so many children today come from broken homes is, in my opinion, a reason for families to be shown as stronger, not weaker.

There is more information at the link above, but questions or submissions should be sent to me at mjb63114@gmail.com.

Please use [Your Name] Young Adventure Submission [Title Of Story] as the subject line of the email. Include in the body of the email a brief description of the story that includes word count, genre, and publication history if any. I am looking for unpublished stories, but may consider stories previously published on-line.

Stories should be attached to the email. Open Office files are preferred, but I can convert word documents or .rtf files. PDFs will not be opened.

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Mongoose and Meerkat Audiobook Live!

Cirsova

The audiobook for Tales of the Mongoose Vol 1: Pursuit Without Asking is now available on Audible!

Erin Michele Gabbard has done a wonderful job bringing these fun and exciting tales to life in her reading.

Please check it out!

Tales of the Mongoose and Meerkat - Vol 1: Pursuit Without Asking Audiobook By Jim Breyfogle cover art

Also, Kat and Mangos’s latest adventure, The Grain Merchant of Alomar, is out now in our spring issue!

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Misha Burnett’s Endless Summer Audio Book Out Now!

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Wylding Hall

Wylding Hall available on Audible Plus

This, in my opinion, is Weird Fiction done right.

First, it works as Fiction, without the Weird. That is to say, it’s a story about a Folk Rock Band who rented a house in the countryside in the early 1970s to record an album. That story is engaging, told in a documentary style, with different voice actors playing the parts of band members and others such as the band’s managers, reporters, and the like.

It’s a kind of memoir of the Psychedelic Era, like Tom Wolfe’s Electric Kool Aid Acid Test or Hunter Thompson’s Hell’s Angels. The drama of the band recovering from the somewhat suspicious suicide of their former lead singer and dealing with the intensity of being isolated together in a remote location, with all of the attendant emotional undercurrents, would have held my interest by itself.

Second, the Weird aspects are understated and subtle. They are kept in the background for most of the novel–strange things glimpsed out of the corner of the reader’s eye. Since it’s told as if the characters are retelling the story years after the fact, there’s a lot of “At the time it didn’t mean much to me, but after what came later…”

That kind of exposition takes a light touch, and Elizabeth Hand does it well, varying the mix of the mundane and the uncanny to keep the reader off-balance and wanting to find out more.

Most important to me, she keeps the sense of Mystery, in a cosmic sense, to the very end. Reviewers on Audible complain that she never explains what happened at Wylding Hall–I consider that a feature, not a bug. The different characters have their own theories, but there is never any big reveal that tears away the veil.

I like that. When the end of the book came I felt a pleasant chill and a sense of a vast dark universe, full of unknown wonders and unanswerable questions.

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Tales Of Yog Sothoth

Click The Link To Pre-Order

I was sent a review copy of this book by one of the contributors.

“Lovecraftian” is one of those overused adjectives that people trot out to mean a lot of different things.

The stories in this collection are linked by a common cosmology. The universe is home to ancient, vastly powerful alien intelligences that are inimical to all ephemeral living things (that would be us).

Yog-Sothoth is The Gate–an aware (but not alive) being that can control the shape of space-time. It is unimaginably powerful, absolutely alien, and hostile to humanity. Also insane.

Given that is the central premise of the collection, I found the stories to be surprisingly upbeat. They are Weird Adventure stories, more than Horror.

The collection takes an interesting approach. The stories take place in settings widely separated in space and time, from the Holy Land in the reign of Richard the First to a post-apocalyptic future. The style of the stories fits their individual time and place, rather than trying for the polysyllabic purple prose that characterizes one of the other usages of “Lovecraftian”. Nary a squamous or a rugose is to be found.

This approach suits the central conceit. An Elder God is eternal–the span from the Twelfth to the Twenty-Second Century is but the blink of one of its myriad eyes.

Despite that, the dangers the characters face are on a terrestrial scale. Monsters, and the walking dead, and servitors of the Elder Gods, but things that can still be dispatched by a man with his wits about him who is handy with steel and lead.

Tales Of Yog-Sothoth will be available on April 27th, 2021.

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Adventure Stories For Young Readers

Click Here To Go To Sanderley Studios

I am partnering with Cedar Sanderson’s newly formed Sanderley Studios to produce a collection of short fiction for young readers.

I am looking for exciting adventure stories that showcase (but not preach) virtues, suitable for boys and girls in their teens.

Submissions open on Mar 15th and will run until May 15th.

The ideal story would be between 5,000 and 10,000 words and be action oriented. All genres considered, but exotic settings preferred–Science Fiction and Fantasy, but also Wilderness Survival and Historical Fiction.

In my opinion children get enough Real Life Drama from assigned school books, this collection should be an escape from their ordinary life.

The audience, as I said, is junior high to high school aged children, but the characters need not be of that age group. Stories that do have young characters should show those characters obedient to parents and legitimate authority. The goal is to model healthy adult/child relationships. The fact that so many children today come from broken homes is, in my opinion, a reason for families to be shown as stronger, not weaker.

There is more information at the link above, but questions or submissions should be sent to me at mjb63114@gmail.com.

Please use [Your Name] Young Adventure Submission [Title Of Story] as the subject line of the email. Include in the body of the email a brief description of the story that includes word count, genre, and publication history if any. I am looking for unpublished stories, but may consider stories previously published on-line.

Stories should be attached to the email. Open Office files are preferred, but I can convert word documents or .rtf files. PDFs will not be opened.

Posted in Artists That I Admire, On Publishing, On Writing | Tagged , , , , , | 3 Comments

Endless Summer Audiobook

I got to listen to the audio files for Endless Summer over the last few days.

I was blown away. Seriously, the experience of having the stories read to me, one after the other, was so intense that I had to stop several times to catch my emotional breath.

Brandon McKernan does an amazing job, and more than that, he gets me. He understands my dry sense of humor, my understated pathos–he fits the tone of my work, hitting all the right notes.

Listening to the audio of my stories lets me experience them “from the outside” in a way that I can’t when I read the text. It’s the closest I can get to enjoying the stories as if they had been written by someone else.

In an email to my publisher I described Endless Summer as my Martian Chronicles. He took that to mean that it’s my masterpiece, and I do believe with as close to objectivity as I can get that the collection contains some of the best stories I’ve written.

But more than that I meant that the “shape” of the collection reminds me of  The Martian Chronicles. There’s the same sense that the stories outline a trajectory, like one of Bradbury’s rocketships. Although, in both cases, it’s an inverted trajectory, diving to perigee and then climbing back up.

In my case the nadir is probably the end of the ironically titled “The Happiest Place On Earth”. I can’t get through that story without crying, and I can hear the emotion in Brandon’s voice as he reads the last lines.

In Bradbury’s case I think his saddest moment is “There Will Come Gentle Rains”–a story which in large part inspired “The Happiest Place”. (The saddest story in Martian Chronicles, anyway. His absolute saddest is, in my opinion, “All Summers In A Day”–another story that I echo, rather distantly, in Endless Summer.)

There is only so much comparing myself to one of the greatest geniuses ever to work in the English language that I can do. I’m not going to claim that Endless Summer is on par with The Martian Chronicles as a work of literature, just that it has a similar structure and, I think, similar themes.

The twin chimeras of loss and hope. There is nothing that can be gained that won’t, in time, slip away–but also nothing that can be lost that might not, someday, be regained.

And I very deliberately mimic Bradbury’s approach to Science Fiction as a genre, with the emphasis on the second word. While my stories are set in the future, they aren’t really about the future, they are about there here and now, my life and your life as we live them every day.

Science Fiction allows us to see, in strange new eyes, familiar tears.

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Reminder On Big Savings On Cirsova Back Issues

Cirsova

We have some enormous stuff just on the horizon that we can’t wait to share with you, but until then, let me vamp by reminding everyone that MANY Cirsova back issues are available from our Aerio store for under $7. If you need to fill gaps in your collection, the best way is to visit our Aerio store!

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